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Tag Archives: Leftovers

Recipes: Hungarian Crepes

I love pancakes. I especially love the variety known as crepes – and crepes are even better when cooked Hungarian style as palacsinta.

Palatschinke

Palatschinke (Photo credit: Mario Spann)

Ingredients
3 large eggs
1 cup milk
1 1/4 cups all-purpose flour
pinch of salt
1 cup carbonated water

Melted butter for cooking crepes

Optional:
1 tablespoon sugar for sweeter dessert palacsinta (crepes)

Directions
1) Beat eggs into milk until blended (also add sugar/salt at this point). Pour the egg/milk mixture into the flour until fully blended into a smooth batter. The batter should rest for at least an hour.

2) When it is time to cook the crepes place a crepe pan to heat (or an 8-inch frying pan). While the pan is heating add the carbonated water to the batter and gently stir until just blended.

3) Add a bit of butter to heat in the hot pan and swirl to cover the bottom.

4) Pour a ladle of the batter into the pan and gently tip and twist the pan so that the batter covers the entire bottom of the pan. When the top of the batter bubbles, turn the pancake over and cook for 4 or 5 seconds longer. Remove the cooked palacsinta to a serving plate in a warm oven until ready to serve.
Continue until the batter is all cooked. Remember to add butter before cooking each palacsinta.

For savory palacsinta fill with cooked asparagus, ham and Havarti cheese…or some other dinner filling
For dessert palacsinta try plum jam OR cinnamon&sugar OR Nutella with strawberries….

Palacsinta can be served hot or cold.

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Feast of Leftovers: Sour Cream Biscuits

Oh the joys of harvest and fresh local vegetables. After the excess of candy and treats, some simple hearty vegetable soup is what the day requires!

biscuits

As always I have extra sour cream and since I have a large pot of cabbage and bean soup – what any soup needs is a nice freshly baked biscuit. And I love sour cream biscuits. Simple and easy to make – and helps get rid of that sour cream sitting in my fridge. I posted another version of sour cream biscuits that uses vegetable shortening. These use lard – and lard makes the best biscuits. Yes rendered pig fat is a a culinary blessing!
(I will post my cabbage and bean recipe soon – my other soup recipes are: Prime Rib, Turkey)

Ingredients
4 cup white flour
1 tablespoon baking powder
1/2 tablespoon salt (or less if desired)
1 teaspoon baking soda
1 cup Lard (at room temperature!)
1/2 cup sour cream
1 large egg
1/4 cup milk

parchment paper

Preheat oven to 350°F
Mix all the dry ingredients thoroughly in a bowl.
In a separate bowl mix the sour cream with the egg until blended.
Place lard in large bowl, and cut with knife into small cubes. Now dump in the dry ingredients!
Use a pastry cutter to blend the shortening into the flour mixture until the mixtures has a course pea-sized texture.
Add the sour cream and cut mixture until it is course crumbs.
Using clean dry hands knead dough 6 to 8 strokes; if dough is too dry and not binding together, slowly add a bit of milk a teaspoon at a time. The mixture should just bind together without being too dry or too moist!
All of the above should be done fairly quickly to avoid over-working the flour and activating the gluten! (which would make the biscuits tough…)
Roll out dough 1/4 inch thick. Lightly dust with flour if it is sticking to the rolling pin. Fold in half, and then fold in half again.
(Yes that would now be a quarter – but this is cooking not math class!)
Now roll out once more to about 1/2 inch thick and cut biscuits (no bigger than 2 inches wide!)

Place biscuits on parchment paper in a cookie sheet. The biscuits should just be touching each other – this will make them puff upwards more than then expand sideways!
Brush the top with any left-over milk to make the tops brown evenly.
Bake for 20 to 25 minutes (until desired golden brown on top)

Let cool a few minutes – and then enjoy!

These biscuits are not only excellent with soup but also really tasty with butter and your favourite jam.

Food : Prime Rib BBQ!

English: USCA Choice standing rib roast (2 bone).

Preparations

First you will need a Prime Rib roast. How big should it be? Depends on how many people and how much meat they like to eat! And how much you want to spend!

HOW BIG?
The rule of thumb is: 1 Rib feeds 2 People. So a 2 Rib roast would feed 4 People. For a backyard BBQ feast that has a lot of other food you can probably estimate 1 Rib for 2.5 People. This is assuming 1 Rib is equal to about 1 Kilogram or about 2.2 Pounds.
Adjust things accordingly for weight!

When you buy your Prime Rib roast look for one with good layer of fat. Fat is flavour. Fat keeps the meat moist while cooking. You can always cut off the fat when serving! You want at least a 1/4 inch (less than 1 cm) of fat on the side away from the bones.

Get a GOOD Meat Thermometer!
The most important item you need in cooking a Prime Rib roast is a good meat thermometer! Prime Rib should not be overcooked. Yes you can estimate times but really the best way to cook this premium cut of meat is with a good, reliable and accurate thermometer. I use a digital thermometer that stays in the roast throughout the cooking process. The one I use has a long lead from the meat probe to an exterior display that sits outside the oven. Very nice for monitoring the cooking progress without opening the door!

COOKING THE ROAST

1) Let the meat come to room temperature before roasting. This may take an hour. A cold Prime Rib will not cook properly, with the outer portion overcooking. Never try and cook a frozen Prime Rib roast!!! Use paper-towels to pat dry the surface of the meat.

2) DO NOT SALT. Salt pulls the moisture from the meat. Season with garlic, or some other rub if you desire. I just rub on some fresh ground pepper.

3) OPTIONAL: Garlic! grab a garlic clove or two and slice into small slivers. Now take a very sharp thin knife and slice small holes all around the roast, inserting a garlic sliver into each hole.

4) OPTIONAL: While the roast is sitting out (see step 1) you can do this! BBQ Rib is even better with a good roast rub. Here is a rub recipe (and you can make your own!).

1 tablespoon coarse ground black pepper
1 teaspoon dried minced onion
1 teaspoon dried minced garlic
1/2 teaspoon dried parsley
1/2 teaspoon red pepper flake

Mix together the pepper, onion, garlic, parsley and pepper flakes.
Remove the butcher’s twine and lightly coat the roast and ribs with oil.
Season on all sides (including the space between the ribs and roast) with the dry rub. Re-tie the beef roast and ribs back together. Now let sit at room temperature for an hour.

5) Set up your BBQ (grill) for indirect heat and preheat to low (250-300°F).

6) Place the roast, bone-side down, on a roasting rack and pan combination. Add enough beef stock or water to fill the pan about 1 inch deep. Optional: Add some dried mushrooms to flavor the liquid base! If you are using a digital thermometer insert it into the roast!

7) Place the roast and pan on the grill on the indirect side where you don’t have any burners on. Close the grill lid and cook until the rib roast hits 10 °F less than your desired level of doneness.
NOTE: This should take about 3 hours for medium rare. It’s a good idea to turn the roast around every 45 minutes or so. (For rare – pull at internal temperature of 115°F. For medium rare – 125°F. For medium – 135°F).

8) Remove the roast and pan set up and let rest at room temperature until the internal temperature stops rising – about 20 minutes. Meanwhile, turn up the grill heat to high (you want it very hot – about 500 °F).

9) Taste the au jus (seasoned broth in the pan) and season to taste with salt and pepper to taste. Keep the au jus warm.

10) Now fully remove the rib bones. Then place the rib bones cut side down over the heat. Also sear the roast 2-3 minutes on the cut side and 1-2 minutes on the other sides.

11) Once the outside of each portion is nicely seared remove from the grill. You may let it rest for a few minutes but it isn’t needed – as it already settled during the previous rest.

12) Slice as desired. Top with some of the au jus and serve.

Sit back and enjoy summer!

Feast of Leftovers: Sour Cream Biscuits

The wonder of this time of year is how much food can be squeezed into a refrigerator, and how much food I can consume without trying!

I seem to have extra sour cream and since I have been making soup – what every soup needs is a nice freshly baked biscuit. And I love sour cream biscuits. Simple and easy to make – and helps get rid of that sour cream sitting in my fridge.
(My soup recipes are: Prime Rib, Turkey)

 

Ingredients
2 cup white flour
1 tablespoon baking powder
1 teaspoons salt
1/4 teaspoon baking soda
1/2 cup shortening
1/2 cup sour cream

Preheat oven to 425°F
Mix dry ingredients thoroughly in a bowl.
Use a pastry cutter to blend.
Add the shortening and cut shortening until mixture has course pea-sized texture.
Add the sour cream and cut mixture until it is course crumbs.
Knead dough 6 to 8 strokes; if dough is too dry and not binding together, slowly add a bit of water a teaspoon at a time.
Roll out dough 1/4 inch thick. Fold in half. Roll out again and fold in half, and half again.
Now roll out to about 1/2 inch thick and cut biscuits;
bake on greased cookie sheet 10 to 15 minutes (until desired golden brown on top)

Let cool a few minutes – and then enjoy!
Not only excellent with soup but also really tasty with butter and strawberry jam.

Feast of Leftovers: Pass the Cheese!

English: Cheese: Le Rustique (French Camembert...

Christmas is a feast.
Christmas is a beast.
Tasty, tasty
eat so hasty
now we gotta leave!

This time of the year is about joy and celebration and family – and excess! That last part is optional really – yet it does seem to be part of how many of us celebrate Christmas. Too excess.

Time for a slow down and a stop. Wind down, feet up. Pause. Today we do not cook!

The leftovers in my fridge are somewhat under control now. Prime rib turned into frozen stock and delicious soup. Turkey magically shrunk from a massive blob in my fridge into more frozen stock, and a hearty turkey soup.

What I seem to have an over-abundance of now is a bunch of odds and ends. Cold cuts, fruit, and cheese! This year I have an plethora of cheese. Whew – I have now used plethora in a blog post so that is off my 2013 bucket list of words.

So today we eat the remains of the soups, and sandwiches made from the cold cuts that need to move on before they become alive! For some reason I went a little wild on cheese so I have Cheddar, Havarti, Camembert, Swiss, and Mozzarella. I did say no cooking – but does toasting count as cooking? Not if the toast involves wine – Cheers!

Wine male

Well yeah I am having wine with my lunch – because the bottle is open and needs to be saved from being wasted. And really there is nothing quite like wine and cheese to satisfy the palette !Fear not the wine will not be wasted! Other things may be wasted in the process…

A toaster oven

I will also be toasting the cheese (not just with wine!) but also in a toaster oven. I don’t count this as cooking – it is simply placing cold ingredients on some bread and clicking a dial. I like ham and cheddar on rye (even if it hasn’t been toasted yet!). But toasted it becomes a warm gooey treat full of flavours.

I am quickly writing this as my open face sandwich toasts. Two pieces of bread. One holds the ham slices. The other holds thin slices of cheddar. If the cheese had not been sliced for an cheese tray I would shred the cheese to help it melt faster. Place on a toaster safe dish or cooking sheet and pop in the toaster oven for a few minutes at 375. Hotter if you like the bread crunchier and the cheese browned slightly.

Then flip the two pieces of bread together. Like a grilled cheese with no grilling!

DING!

My lunch is ready.

Ham and Cheese Toastie

Now to go read a book and enjoy my leftover feast of the day!